Conversation on the NT: Canonicity and Reliability, Part 3

Wednesday, October 24th, 7:30pm, ECC Room 18.

Dr. Steven Lulich will lead part three of our conversation on the New Testament and the formation of the canon. This week Dr. Lulich will guide an exploration of early church figures such as Origen, Irenaus and Tertullian (follow links for readings) and how the understood and contribute to the formation of the canon.

Audio from past lectures can be found on the Past Lectures page. Also past reading can be found on the blog posts for each lecture.

Audio From Part 2 of Conversation on NT Canonicity and Reliability

NT CONVERSATIONSDr. Steven Lulich led an excellent exploration of the canon as it was developing in the early church. The audio is available to stream or download. To get the most out of this lecture, you may want to open the following documents, as Dr. Lulich works through each one in turn: Timeline, Eusebius Ecclesiastical History (III.24/25), Muratorian Fragment, and Early Canon Lists.

Part Three of the Conversation is scheduled for Wednesday, Oct 24th, 7:30pm.

Part Two of Our Conversation on NT Canonicity and Reliability

Wednesday Night, 7:30pm, ECC Room 18.

This Wednesday, we pick up the conversation on New Testament Canonicity and Reliability. Dr. Steven Lulich will be the conversation leader this Wednesday, leading an exploration of the earliest explicit canon lists, including that of the great Early Church historian Eusebius of Caesaraea. Eusebius gives us a wonderful view not only of the books in the canon, but also of the logic behind the Church’s recognition of their canonicity in the decades before the Council of Nicaea and the conversion of Emperor Constantine. If you can, take a few minutes and read through these five pages from Eusebius’ Ecclesiastical History.

The audio for part one is available for stream or download.

Chapter’s on NT for discussion.

NT CONVERSATIONSThis coming Wednesday, Bob Whitaker and Steven Lulich will kick off the discussion on the New Testament, wrestling with questions related to canonicity and reliability. Week one, the discussion will revolve around F.F. Bruce’s book, The New Testament Documents: Are They Reliable. Chapter one and two are available here.

This Wednesday is the first part of a 4-part exploration of these questions and others related to the New Testament.  These conversations will be held on four Wednesday nights (September 26th, October 10 & 24, and November 7) at 7:30 pm, Room 18 at ECC.

Thinking About Faith Discussion Group

Thinking About Faith is a discussion group that is sponsored by TFIU. This term it will meet every other Wednesday 7-8:30pm, starting tomorrow night, Sept. 5th. We discuss short readings at the intersection of Christian faith and culture that are accessible to everyone but that have something thoughtful and provocative to say. Theology, philosophy, history, science, fiction, poetry, art, and cultural reflections are all fair game.
Who’s welcome to join in? Anyone. We have many IU faculty, staff, and grad students with a few non-IU folks and undergrads occasionally sprinkled in. We welcome both people who feel firmly rooted in their faith and their understanding of Christian teaching and those who have doubts and questions to varying degrees. We also welcome people who have distanced themselves from their childhood faith but want to take another look in the company of others who will respect and welcome them as they are. Our hope is to create an environment where people can be honest and open with each other and come to meetings expecting to be challenged in constructive, faith-maturing ways. And, finally, yes, it’s ok to be an irregular attender, and you wouldn’t be the only one!
If you are interested, please contact the host, IU philosophy professor Tim O’Connor (toconnor@indiana.edu), for location and other info.

 

Speaker Bio: Dr. Steven Lulich

What does the Gettysburg Address have to teach us about the reliability of the New Testament documents?  Is it true that there are more textual variants than words in the New Testament? Dr. Steven Lulich will address issues of New Testament textual reliability at our upcoming Trinity Fellowship Event, this Wednesday night (Mar 28th), 7:00pm in Room 1122 of the Global and International Studies Building.

steven_lulich
Dr. Steven Lulich

Dr. Steven Lulich has been a part of the IU scholar community since 2010, serving as a lecturer, visiting research scientist, and assistant professor, working both in the Linguistics and Speech and Hearing departments at Indiana University. Prior to coming to Bloomington, Steven worked at Washington University in St. Louis as a research scientist and as a lecturer at MIT. He received his Bachelor’s Degree in Linguistics from Dartmouth College and his PhD from MIT in Speech and Hearing Bioscience and Technology. Dr. Lulich has taught a wide variety of courses in the areas of speech, acoustics, research methods and linguistics, including “Word Crime: Language as Evidence”, an undergraduate course in forensic linguistics. Dr. Lulich has done research on a variety of languages, including Russian, Polish, Oroqen (an endangered language of northeast China and Siberia; pronounced “o-ro-CHEN”), Hungarian, Brazilian Portuguese, German, and (of course) English. He studied Classical and Koine (New Testament) Greek formally at Dartmouth College (including advanced classes on Homer, Aristophanes, and New Testament) and has continued to be involved in Classical and Koine Greek informal translation projects (Homer, Plato, Apostolic Fathers, Pauline and Johannine epistles) and teaching projects in Boston, Saint Louis, and Bloomington (including 3 classes at ECC, focusing on 2 John and Philemon). In addition, he informally contributed to the development of machine learning approaches for analyzing Classical and New Testament Greek texts, as acknowledged in two conference proceedings from 2007 and 2008.

Trinity Forum March Event

Wednesday, March 28th. 7:00 pm.
“Textual Reliability: What can the Gettysburg Address teach us about the reliability of the New Testament?”
Join us as Dr. Steven Lulich leads us to consider the textual reliability of the Greek New Testament manuscripts from a historical perspective.

Global and International Studies, Room 1122